950 Lawyering Skills Course, Spring 2011 to Spring 2015

Categories: Law Practice Skills

Death Penalty

Course Page for Fall 2014 - Tuerkheimer, Frank

This will be a one-credit course commencing October 9th, meeting four times for two hours (330-530 Thursdays) prior to the Friday, October 31 Kastenmeier lecture (at which attendance is required) and then once afterwards. Students will be asked to write a 10-12 page brief on a death-penalty-related issue with limited expectations about necessary research. (To keep the research from becoming too time-consuming, students will be allowed to collaborate on research but all writing must be individual.) The course is mandatory pass/fail.

Family Law I skills

Course Page for Fall 2013 - Brito, Tonya

Oral Communications for Lawyers:
Surveys reveal that improved oral communication skills, speaking to public bodies, meeting with clients, handling simple matters in court, communicating with a trade
group or organization) are a priority legal skill not often taught in law school.  Oral Communications for Lawyers is an interactive, hands-on course designed to develop
and improve students’ public speaking skills. Each student will learn by doing, in a variety of scenarios, and receive constructive, personalized feedback on
his/her performance.

Governing criteria for reviewing presentations: messages should be clear, concise, complete,
audience connection, real (genuine and believable), confident, produce desired results.The class will meet
8 times, and students will speak no less than six times, in varying formats and settings. They will also make occasional impromptu presentations, of two or
three minutes, during the course of the semester. Attendance is mandatory, and active student participation is required. Most assignments require structured, focused preparation outside of class. There is no written final examination. The course, which is graded pass/fail, is open to all second and third year
students, and enrollment is limited. Course materials may be purchased at the Bookmart.

Guardian ad Litem Practice in Wisconsin

Course Page for Spring 2015 - Viney, Gretchen

Lawyering Skills: Guardian ad Litem Practice in Wisconsin. A guardian ad litem in Wisconsin is an attorney appointed by the court to represent the best interests of an individual in court proceedings. Guardians ad litem typically are involved on behalf of children in protective services proceedings or in custody and placement disputes, and on behalf of adults in guardianship and protective placement proceedings. This is a practice-oriented skills class in which students learn the skills and techniques necessary for competent service as

guardians ad litem in Wisconsin. The course provides a brief overview of the role of the guardian ad litem in the Wisconsin court system and the requirements for serving as a guardian ad litem, but the emphasis is on preparing students for hands-on guardian ad litem practice. The course meets the requirements of Wisconsin Supreme Court Rule 35 (Eligibility

for Appointment as Guardian ad Litem for a Minor) and Wisconsin Supreme Court Rule 36 (Eligibility for Appointment as Guardian ad Litem for an Adult). Students who successfully complete the course will be eligible, upon admission to the Bar, to accept court appointments as guardians ad litem for children and adults in Wisconsin.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Lawyering Skills Course

Course Page for Spring 2015 - Viney, Gretchen, Cagle, Ralph

The Lawyering Skills Course teaches law practice through simulations in which each student has ample opportunities to practice such fundamental lawyering skills as negotiation, oral advocacy and communication, interviewing and counseling, drafting and problem solving. Students also examine how practicing lawyers address difficult ethical and professional problems, manage their practices, and balance their professional and personal lives.

The Course is led by Professor Gretchen Viney. In addition, the Course is taught by approximately 50 practicing lawyers and other professionals. Teams of practitioners teach each of nine weekly segments in both large group and small group classes. Students observe and simulate the lawyer's role when handling civil, criminal and divorce cases, when processing real estate and probate matters, and when organizing and advising corporations.

In addition to nine substantive segments of the Course and a variety of workshops, the Course includes a Skills Intensive Training Week. More than twenty lawyers participate as faculty in a two day exercise in which students represent clients on both sides of a comprehensive legal transaction. Skills Week allows students to practice the skills they have learned throughout the Course and receive individualized feedback from different practitioners on their performance.

Classes meet from 1:10 to 4:00 PM on designated days and students complete two written assignments each week. Beginning in 2016, the course will NOT meet on Fridays. The course is 8 credits, offered only in the spring semester, and is open to 2nd and 3rd year law students. Enrollment is limited.

If you have questions about this course, contact:Prof. Gretchen Viney in Room 5226; 262-8048; ggviney@wisc.edu

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Lawyers as Community Leaders

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Cagle, Ralph

Lawyers As Community Leaders: Communities frequently seek out to lawyers to provide leadership.   These opportunities enable lawyers to influence their communities, practice and expand their professional skills, develop connections (including clients) and realize great personal satisfaction.  Community leadership engages a lawyer’s aspirations and talents to achieve public good. This practical, hands on course deals with developing the tools needed to  provide that leadership.  Students will learn: a) how communities organize themselves and engage lawyers to achieve public good: b) the nature of leadership and its application in community settings; and, c) specific skills, knowledge and perspectives that will assist them when serving in leadership roles. The faculty has diverse experiences in community leadership.  Over a dozen experts will participate  in the course providing information, networking and helpful advice on how to meet community leadership challenges. This two (2) credit course meets once weekly (Wednesday 5:40 to 7:40 ). Class attendance is required. Grading is based on class projects, attendance and class engagement. A third credit option is available for students interested in working on a specific leadership project in a community organization. Faculty:   Michelle Behnke, Ralph Cagle, Jennifer Krueger

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Mediation

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Frankel, Mark

This course will explore the rationales, advantages, disadvantages, as well as the lawyering skills required to maximize the benefits of the two primary alternative dispute resolution techniques, mediation and arbitration. Students will learn in a hands-on format which cases are appropriate for
ADR, how and when cases can be diverted from litigation into ADR, what clients need to know to succeed in ADR and what approaches to mediation and arbitration are most likely to result in a successful result.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Mediation Skills & Practice

Course Page for Spring 2011 - Erez-Navot, Donna


















Lawyering Skills
Program: Mediation Skills and Practice:  

This course provides an
opportunity to develop both conceptual knowledge and behavioral competency in
mediation.  Mediation is a process
incorporating both aspirational goals (reduction of conflict, increased
communication, and collaborative problem-solving) and concrete goals
(efficiency and reaching agreement). This course has two building-blocks: a practice component and a weekly
academic component.
There are three mandatory course components to complete
the practice component: 1) Facilitative mediation training on

Saturday, January 22, 2011 from 
9 AM to 5 PM at the UW

Law
School
.  2) One mediation observation at the Waukesha
County Small Claims Court for which students must be available to travel and
attend one Monday during the semester from 1 PM to 4:30 PM. 
3) Students must set up and attend a
second mediation observation
with the


Waukesha
Community
Mediation
Center
(at an available time).  By the end of the semester, students
completing the practice course requirements can be certified as mediators
through the


Waukesha
Community
Mediation
Center
.
  During the two-hour
weekly classes, students will develop an understanding of the theories and
practice techniques of mediation from planning to drafting final agreements
through lecture, class discussion, demonstrations, and practice simulations.
Final grades are based
on: 1) class attendance and active participation; 2) reports of two mediation
observations; and 3) a final research paper and class presentation on a
selected mediation or alternative dispute resolution topic.



 

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Oral Communication

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Plum, Christina

A recent survey of legal employers in Wisconsin revealed that they believe that well-developed oral communication skills are essential. This course focuses on helping students refine the oral communication skills that they will need to perform efficiently and effectively as practicing attorneys.  Students will participate in a variety of in-class exercises, such as introducing a speaker, arguing a motion to a judge and giving a presentation to a board composed of non-attorneys.
Each student will receive specific, personalized feedback on his/her performance in the exercises. 

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Oral Communications

Course Page for Fall 2014 - Plum, Christina

Oral Communications for Lawyers:
Surveys reveal that improved oral communication skills, speaking to public bodies, meeting with clients, handling simple matters in court, communicating with a trade
group or organization) are a priority legal skill not often taught in law school.  Oral Communications for Lawyers is an interactive, hands-on course designed to develop
and improve students’ public speaking skills. Each student will learn by doing, in a variety of scenarios, and receive constructive, personalized feedback on
his/her performance.

Governing criteria for reviewing presentations: messages should be clear, concise, complete,
audience connection, real (genuine and believable), confident, produce desired results.The class will meet
8 times, and students will speak no less than six times, in varying formats and settings. They will also make occasional impromptu presentations, of two or
three minutes, during the course of the semester. Attendance is mandatory, and active student participation is required. Most assignments require structured, focused preparation outside of class. There is no written final examination. The course, which is graded pass/fail, is open to all second and third year
students, and enrollment is limited. Course materials may be purchased at the Bookmart.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Oral Communications (LLM-LI)

Course Page for Spring 2011 - Plum, Christina

The Lawyering Skills Course teaches law practice through simulations in which each student has ample opportunities to practice such fundamental lawyering skills as negotiation, oral advocacy and communication, interviewing and counseling, drafting and problem solving. Students also examine how practicing lawyers address difficult ethical and professional problems, manage their practices, and balance their professional and personal lives.

The Course is led by two faculty members, Ralph Cagle and Gretchen Viney. In addition, the Course is taught by approximately 70 practicing lawyers and other professionals. Teams of practitioners teach each of nine weekly segments in both large group and small group classes. Students will observe and simulate the lawyer's role when handling civil, criminal and divorce cases, when processing real estate and probate matters, and when organizing and advising corporations.

In addition to nine substantive segments of the Course and a variety of workshops, the Course includes a Skills Intensive Training Week. Over thirty lawyers participate as faculty in a two day exercise in which students represent clients on both sides of a comprehensive legal transaction. Skills Week allows students to practice the skills they have learned throughout the Course and receive individualized feedback from different practitioners on their performance.

Classes meet from 12:25-3:25 PM on designated days and students complete two written assignments each week. The course is 7 credits, offered only in the spring semester, and is open to 2nd and 3rd year law students. Enrollment is limited.

If you have questions about this course, contact:

Prof. Ralph Cagle in Room 5226 or call @ 262-7881 or by email: rmcagle@wisc.edu

Prof. Gretchen Viney in Room 5226 or call @ 262-8048 or by email: ggviney@wisc.edu

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Public Speaking for Lawyers

Course Page for Spring 2014 - Plum, Christina

Lawyering Skills: Public Speaking for Lawyers is an exercise-based course that focuses on helping students refine the oral communication skills that they will need to perform efficiently and effectively as practicing attorneys. Students will participate in a variety of in-class exercises, such as introducing a speaker, explaining a research assignment to a supervising attorney, and giving a legal presentation to an audience of non-lawyers. Each student will receive specific, personalized feedback on his/her performance in the exercises. The grading for this one-credit class will be pass/fail. The class will meet once a week for the first eight weeks of the semester for two hours at a time. Attendance is mandatory and students must actively participate to be awarded a passing grade. Some assignments will require preparation outside class, but there are no formal written assignments or written examinations. This class is open to second and third year students.

Public Speaking for Lawyers (LLM-LI)

Course Page for Spring 2014 - Plum, Christina

The Lawyering Skills Course teaches law practice through simulations in which each student has ample opportunities to practice such fundamental lawyering skills as negotiation, oral advocacy and communication, interviewing and counseling, drafting and problem solving. Students also examine how practicing lawyers address difficult ethical and professional problems, manage their practices, and balance their professional and personal lives.

The Course is led by two faculty members, Ralph Cagle and Gretchen Viney. In addition, the Course is taught by approximately 70 practicing lawyers and other professionals. Teams of practitioners teach each of nine weekly segments in both large group and small group classes. Students will observe and simulate the lawyer's role when handling civil, criminal and divorce cases, when processing real estate and probate matters, and when organizing and advising corporations.

In addition to nine substantive segments of the Course and a variety of workshops, the Course includes a Skills Intensive Training Week. Over thirty lawyers participate as faculty in a two day exercise in which students represent clients on both sides of a comprehensive legal transaction. Skills Week allows students to practice the skills they have learned throughout the Course and receive individualized feedback from different practitioners on their performance.

Classes meet from 12:25-3:25 PM on designated days and students complete two written assignments each week. The course is 7 credits, offered only in the spring semester, and is open to 2nd and 3rd year law students. Enrollment is limited.

If you have questions about this course, contact:

Prof. Ralph Cagle in Room 5226 or call @ 262-7881 or by email: rmcagle@wisc.edu

Prof. Gretchen Viney in Room 5226 or call @ 262-8048 or by email: ggviney@wisc.edu

Risk Management

Course Page for Spring 2013 - Kaiser, Aviva

Risk Management (1-2 credit variable)

You have learned or are learning the Rules of Professional Conduct. But how do you implement those rules in your practice? How do you avoid the risk of running afoul of those rules? The goal of this one-credit course is to teach you some of the basic skills that you can use to manage your risk. The following skills will be taught:

1. How to use the specialized research sources for professional conduct issues;
2. How to use case management software;
3. How to develop and implement law firm policies and procedures to reasonably assure that all lawyers and nonlawyers in the firm follow the Rules of Professional Conduct;
4. How to counsel clients about the lawyer’s role and duties;
5. How to draft letters of engagement/ retainer agreements;
6. How to do conflicts of interest checks;
7. How to draft informed consents;
8. How to evaluate the various types of fees and draft the fee section of letters of engagement/retainer agreements;
9. How to evaluate the unbundling of services and draft the scope of representation section of letters of engagement/retainer agreements;
10. How to read and evaluate liability insurance policies; and
11. How to screen cases and clients to avoid the ones with the greatest risk of malpractice by identifying risk factors such as expectations, communications, and control.

If you are currently enrolled in or have already taken the professional responsibilities course, you may enroll in this course. Please join us in this exciting skills course.
Note: Students who select the two-credit option will draft additional documents and learn more about case management software.

Risk Management Skills

Course Page for Spring 2012 - Kaiser, Aviva

Risk Management Skills Module: You have learned or are learning the Rules of Professional Conduct. But how do you implement those rules in your practice? How do you avoid the risk of running afoul of those rules? The goal of this one-credit skills module is to teach you some of the basic skills that you can use to manage your risk. The following skills will be taught in the one-credit skills module:
1. How to use the specialized research sources for professional conduct issues;
2. How to navigate the disciplinary process;
3. How to use case management software;
4. How to develop and implement law firm policies and procedures to reasonably assure that all lawyers and nonlawyers in the firm follow the Rules of Professional Conduct;
5. How to counsel clients about the lawyer’s role and duties;
6. How to draft letters of engagement/ retainer agreements;
7. How to draft informed consents;
8. How to evaluate the various types of fees and draft the fee section of letters of engagement/retainer agreements;
9. How to evaluate the unbundling of services and draft the scope of representation section of letters of engagement/retainer agreements;
10. How to read and evaluate liability insurance policies; and
11. How to screen cases and clients to avoid the ones with the greatest risk of malpractice by identifying risk factors such as expectations, communications, and control.
If you are currently enrolled in or have already taken the professional responsibilities course, you may enroll the skills module. Please join us in this exciting skills module.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Understanding Law Practice

Course Page for Fall 2011 - Moore, Michael

This short course will provide a foundation for professional skills needed by attorneys for professional success. The course will cover topics such as professionalism and professional expectations, the business of law and how to make an effective impression for clients and peers. In addition, students will practice these skills through assignments and in class presentations.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Watergate

Course Page for Fall 2013 - Tuerkheimer, Frank

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Saturday Night Massacre, an historic event generally seen as a critical turning point in the viability of the Nixon Presidency. It is for that reason that we have asked John Dean to present the annual Kastenmeier Lecture, to be held at 4:00 pm on Friday, October 4, 2013.
The Watergate course is a one credit course is tied in to John Dean’s talk. John Dean was central in the conspiracy to obstruct justice which ultimately led to the resignation of the President, the only such event in U.S. history.

The course will meet for four two hour sessions in the period before the Dean lecture and one the week after the lecture. Naturally, attendance at the Dean lecture is required. The course is for one credit.

The basic reading for the course will consist of three books, Dean’s Blind Ambition, Woodward and Bernstein’s The Final Days and Ben-Veniste and Framton’s Stonewall: The Story Behind the Watergate Prosecution Some of these may not be readily available in bookstores but they are available through Amazon. Students may wish to begin the readings during the summer. These books tell a story and Dean’s book should be read before the Woodward and Bernstein book as the latter picks up the Watergate story approximately where Dean’s leaves off. Stonewall should be read last.

The course is taught by Frank Tuerkheimer who has been on the law faculty at Wisconsin since 1970 and presently is Emeritus Professor of Law. He is a Visiting Professor of Law at the New York Law School where he has taught Evidence each spring for the past five years. He was an Associate Special Prosecutor on the Watergate Special Prosecution Force from 1973 to 1975.

Writing Component

Course Page for Spring 2012 - Heymann, Jane

The Lawyering Skills Course teaches law practice through simulations in which each student has ample opportunities to practice such fundamental lawyering skills as negotiation, oral advocacy and communication, interviewing and counseling, drafting and problem solving. Students also examine how practicing lawyers address difficult ethical and professional problems, manage their practices, and balance their professional and personal lives.

The Course is led by two faculty members, Ralph Cagle and Gretchen Viney. In addition, the Course is taught by approximately 70 practicing lawyers and other professionals. Teams of practitioners teach each of nine weekly segments in both large group and small group classes. Students will observe and simulate the lawyer's role when handling civil, criminal and divorce cases, when processing real estate and probate matters, and when organizing and advising corporations.

In addition to nine substantive segments of the Course and a variety of workshops, the Course includes a Skills Intensive Training Week. Over thirty lawyers participate as faculty in a two day exercise in which students represent clients on both sides of a comprehensive legal transaction. Skills Week allows students to practice the skills they have learned throughout the Course and receive individualized feedback from different practitioners on their performance.

Classes meet from 12:25-3:25 PM on designated days and students complete two written assignments each week. The course is 7 credits, offered only in the spring semester, and is open to 2nd and 3rd year law students. Enrollment is limited.

If you have questions about this course, contact:

Prof. Ralph Cagle in Room 5226 or call @ 262-7881 or by email: rmcagle@wisc.edu

Prof. Gretchen Viney in Room 5226 or call @ 262-8048 or by email: ggviney@wisc.edu